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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
now. we have a new transition coming on in egypt. you have conflagrations within syria. the whole region is teetering and the whole region is brittle, politically and strategically. and into the mix now the israelis come with this major operation against gaza. they cannot live in the region and claim that they are to the going to be touched by the reverberations taking place in the region. >> brown: do you see a kind of political solution? and what will the u.s. role be. >> i disagree with a lot of things that was said now. but one thing i very strongly agree. there is no political solution. and there can to the be a political solution because what you have in gaza is an organization dedicated it to the destruction of israel, dedicated to killing of jews. this is what they say openly. i mean this is not an interpretation of what they're saying. this is what they're saying. as long as the threat exists they will fight israel. they are committed to an anti-sellity-- anti-semitic of killing juice jews, it's in their charter n their document t is what they are openly saying. they are
this through. newmembers of syria's opposition coalition are seeking former role recognition of the west and held talks in london. it said they still needed to submit plans for a political solution. it said britain would offer its support. our diplomatic correspondent has the latest. >> a regime bombing run in northern syria. this act of this video shows the bombs falling. it is the latest evidence of an unequal war that opposition rebels are convinced they can win. fighters of the free syrian army insists they are taking ground. but opposition leaders have been greatly hampered by deep divisions until now. which is what makes these pictures so significant. the new opposition coalition to discuss ways that britain can strengthen their hand. first, the government needed assurances from the opposition leader. >> i welcome the commitment he has made to reach out to all opposition groups and communities and to respect human rights, to finalize a clear plan for political transition in syria, and of course to demonstrate how the coalition can be a credible political alternative to the upside r
.6 billion. and the iranians and the saw des are fighting in a country called syria. we do not have a democratic resolution in syria. those are the guys whose side we tend to be on. and then approximately for the iranians, they happen to be a facade. that's the big picture. ingly wish i could pick your brain for another couple hours, but we've got to get to the weather forecast. "the god problem." i suggest you head over to the bookstore or maybe go online and get it on your kindle. topper? >> yeah, good stuff. >>> all right, let's talk about the cooler weather. it was 72 here on monday. 65 on tuesday, although a footnote, that 65 occurred at midnight. 49 y.51 today. shooting for 54 tomorrow. the temperatures have taken a tumble. average high is about 59. the live look outside, the live weather cam. there's a game going on. right now 47. high again only 51. dew points in the 30s. winds are northeast at 6 and the pressure has gone up just a little bit since the last hour. satellite picture radar combined. we will talk about this storm out in the west later tomorrow and the next day.
in and out of israeli cities, civilians, and an ammunition dump from weapons coming in from iran, syria, and they're continuing to do that. now no nation, no people and no government could sit idle when, you know, missiles are being shot indiscriminately against civilians. not in london, not in paris and not in washington. >> no rational person would disagree that the rocket firing has got to stop. it is a senseless activity that can only lead to more bloodshed. however, as i said to prime minister netanyahu when i sat down with him in jerusalem last year, this clear repression, oppression, whatever you want to call it on the gaza strip, these people are desperate and when there are desperate people with desperate policy and no hope, they often turn to terrorist groups whether to foment their fury and anger. where does this terrible cycle end? what is the constructive way through this? >> i want to make something perfectly clear. hamas are the enemies of peace. not just the enemies of israel. they are the enemies of peace, regional stability in the region, and to peace both internally o
next door in syria. you have a different government in egypt and the morrisey government is reacting differently than perhaps the mubarak government did before. >> what's the short-term solution then? >> well, i think the danger for israel for example, it has a right of self-defense, but obviously if it decides to return ground troops to gaza the optics there work against israel in a much -- in a region that now is governed far more by populism than by authoritarianism. i think it has to make sure that its response is aggressive, tries to deal with the threat to israel's people, but doesn't go too far. >> let's talk about the united states' potential role. health care was president obama's defining achievement for his first term. when we look at a second term will the president look at middle east peace, the road map to peace might this be his big deal for his second term? does it need to be? >> i think that's part of the motivation here. you know, you have coming up the palestinian authority which of course controls the west bank but not gaza is preparing to try to move toward enhan
on in syria, other parts of the region, all the while, the gulf arabs, especially, feeling menaced by the events in iran. it is complicated. they're a lot of intersecting conflicts. i do think the immediate task must be to stabilize the situation, to reduce the violence, to bring about to an immediate cease-fire. one similar to what has gone 9 for many years. >> -- gone on for many years. >> thank you for joining us from new york. the cia has opened an investigation into the conduct of its former director david petraeus who resigned last week over an extramarital affair. an agency spokesman says the investigation is exploratory and does not presuppose any particular outcome. he is scheduled to testify tomorrow in front of lawmakers on the attack in benghazi. president obama has pledged ongoing federal support for areas struggling to recover after a storm sandy. he went to new york for the first time with the devastation and that with families, officials, and first responders. it has been 2.5 years since an explosion on an oil rig in the gulf of mexico killed 11 people and unleashed
, and it is a very volatile situation. you mentioned the war on syria. egypt is going in a very difficult direction. it is a quagmire, and you have to be careful the whole region does not explode. >> thank you so much for joining us here in studio. >> france's new prime minister has made his first official visit to germany, holding talks with german chancellor. at the top of the agenda was stagnant economic growth in france and europe generally. >> he told reporters that france remain committed to keeping greece in the eurozone and said it was in the interests of all eurozone countries to show solidarity with debt-stricken member states. for more on this now, we're joined from our parliamentary studiosy our political correspondent. there's been an awful lot of talk about deteriorating franco- german relations recently. what can you say after this visit? >> for the last six months, there has been quite a bit of tension mainly because angela merkel came out during the last presidential elections in france, very openly for nicholas sarkozy, which got her off on to a very bad start with the current fre
an assessment about what intervention in syria might require. the pentagon says a u.s. military effort to seize the stockpile of chemical weapons require upward of 75,000 troops and the "times" reports that senior american officials are concerned that the militant group hezbollah have set up training camps near the chemical weapons depots. >>> four people were killed in texas when a freight train slammed into a parade float carrying wounded veterans. this is just terrible. the accident happened at a railroad crossing in midland, texas, as the float tried to get around the safety gates and lights. the float was made with a flat bed trailer with chairs for each of the veterans. in addition to the four deaths, others were injured. >> this may be one of the most tragic events we've had in our town and it's a sad day. i shook their hands and saw them personally, met their wives. it truly was an honor to be in their presence. these guys are true american heroes. >> secretary of defense leon panetta issued a statement saying he's deeply saddened. the ntsb is sending a team to midland to investigate. >
factors in the middle east is what is going on in syria. the syrian -- there are a few -- not missiles but some explosions in the golan along the syrian/israeli border. is that also one of the approximate causes that's destabilizing not only what's going on in gaza but what may happen with hezbollah? >> i don't think so. i think that civil war has potential to spread -- it has potential to spread to turkey, to iraq, to jordan not really to israel. i think that israel lobbed a few shells to warn them to stay away from the border. but no faction sees itself advantaged -- the other factions by getting israel involved. >> eliot: one of the more worrisome developments in the past week, in my mind has been that jordan which has been unfortunately besieged by several hundred thousand refugees from syria is also seeing some domestic violence with riots because of gas prices and jordan had been to a certain extent, the island of stability within the arab world. how do you assess that dynamic? >> that's highly dangerous
. syria will not show much of turkey. they are incapable of showing much of israel. the real issue is what is their view towards iran and what will be their goal? >> i don't think that they are in a position that they have much choice. other than taking action. the united states -- president obama has not had israel's accents in office. they continue to enrich uranium and get a nuclear weapon. they want to wipe israel off the face of the map. how can they not take this area sleep? >> the whole dynamic has changed with the sense of the muslim brotherhood in egypt. they are now running the show in egypt. the very first one meeting that the egyptian muslim brotherhood -- there is a new online fair to the israel people and the turks a couple of years ago started reaching out to the iranians, too. now you have the full encirclement of israel by iran. lou: as we look at this, now we turn to northern africa. the role of al qaeda. house intelligence and senate intelligence committees -- do you think they will be forthcoming? >> yes, i do. another network reporting that david atrios wants to testif
be bad news all around. already this region is destabilized. you've got this ongoing civil war in syria. you've got tensions in lebanon and that brings in hezbollah. and now with these post-arab spring democracies, these countries are much more answerable to their people. and if their people see that this situation in gaza is untenable and if they start to take to the streets, to protest against their leaders, if it enflames the arab street more than it has in the past, that would cause more instability. >> but at this point, what is the u.s. obligation to israel, for defense in this situation, but also, what kind of pressure to exert? >> reporter: the u.s. has this historic agreement to defend israel and stand by israel. what it hopes to be able to do is encourage israel not to cause too many civilian casualties, like what happened last time. but beyond that, the united states is not going to get involved on the ground. >> where do you place the odds that hamas will listen to the egyptians and, indeed, there will be a cease-fire? >> reporter: i think it's going to take some time. but t
administration an assessment of what this might entail. the pentagon says a u.s. military effort to seize syria's stockpiles of chemical weapons would require upward of 75,000 troops and "the times" reports that senior american officials are concerned that hezbollah has set up camp near the chemical weapons depose. the white house declined to comment. >>> four people were killed in texas when a freight train slammed into a parade float carrying wounded veterans. this is just terrible. it's an accident that happened at a railroad crossing in midland, texas, as the float tried to get around the safety gates and lights. the float was made with a flatbed trailer. in addition to the four deaths, there were 17 people injured. m midland's mayor reacted to the accident. >> this may be one of the most tragic events we've had in our town and it's a sad day. i shook their hands and saw them personally and met their wives. it truly was an honor to be in their presence. these guys are true american heroes. >> that's for sure. secretary of defense leon panetta issued a statement saying he's deeply saddened.
that fighting between israel and hamas will spread including unrest in syria, concerns about iran. how quickly could things get completely out of control, among other cnn's fareed zakaria will speak with us as well. to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. two. three. my credit card rewards are easy to remember. with the bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. [ both ] 2% back on groceries. [ all ] 3% on gas! no hoops to jump through. i earn more cash back on the things i buy most. [ woman in pet store ] it's as easy as... [ all ] one! -two. -[ all ] three! [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. social secur
, but neither do i see it as very helpful in pressing russia on issues like iran or their conduct towards syria. russian opposition level leaders, however, and russian civil society, and the russian press, what free press remains in russia today really support this legislation. and i think what this legislation intends is sort of a mutually beneficial relationship with russia based on a rule of law. based on human rights. that's the hope. it includes the sergei magnitsky legislation that came out of the foreign affairs committee of which i am an original co-sponsor, and i do think we owe a debt of gratitude to chairman ros-lehtinen for her determination to have that provision in the legislation. and i think if we reflect on the words of the russian opposition in their parliament, one said recently, this provision is very pro-russian. it helps defend us in russia from criminals. it helps defend us from criminals who kill our citizens, who steal our money, and hide it abroad. and that's the point. that's what we are trying to do with that provision. and this bill liberalizing trade while at the s
war. you saw israeli tanks fired into syria because syria had been lobing rockets into northern israel, maybe going after rebel groups and misfiring. nonetheless, israel's sovereignty now has been assaulted both in the north and now in the southern part of israel bordering gaza. it's a very, very difficult strategic situation for israel in the midst of this turbulence in the arab world. >> you're not kidding. button it up for us, ken. >> we have to be careful about suggesting that the egyptians will want to break the treaty between israel and egypt. there's a lot in it for egypt. mr. morsi has to be a pragmatist. he knows he can't alienate the united states. he may want to impose a measure of islamism. >> thanks so much for enlightening us. we appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> we'll take a quick break and be back with much more in the newsroom. meet the 5-passenger ford c-max hybrid. when you're carrying a lot of weight, c-max has a nice little trait, you see, c-max helps you load your freight, with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats priu
in egypt. we have a civil war in syria impacting that entire area. i have to ask you about the air strikes to jerusalem. as martin fletcher mentioned, this did not happen. >> there's a large palestinian population in jerusalem, which is not quite the same number of arabs live in tel aviv. a fair number live in tel aviv, but a large number of arabs live in palestinian. it's the first time a rocket was fired into jerusalem for 40 years. it's what baffling. it absolutely has escalated issues, and it's definitely now emboldened israel's case we're trying to preserve peace in our own countryland. >> obviously, the loss of life, including children in gaza. when anyone hears the headline 13 dead, many of them children, we know the reaction. >> i mean, this turned into in 24 hours an increasingly bloody conflict. we saw photos and video coming out. there's dead children on both sides. >> absolutely. >> wrapped in shrouds. it's escalating and getting very precare yus for the entire region. >> thank you very much, jim. we'll see what the next 48 hours bringi brings us. president has start aid meetin
region. we've got now syria, lebanon, hezbollah. of course, hamas, which i think israel is going to wipe away. what about egypt? what about turkey? and what about iran? in other words, how big is this going to be? how much is this going to spread? this may become a massive world event. may become, for all i know, a financial market event. but i want to ask both of you gentlemen with the remaining moments we have, how far is this going to spread? >> first, larry, you already raised one of the problems. and that is there's been indecision and uncertainty in washington on our middle east policy, whether it's being tougher on benjamin netanyahu for defending israel than they've been on iran for not having nuclear weapons. whether it is the conflicting approaches to the middle east peace process, et cetera. so there's a vacuum that has to be filled. the u.s. has to step up and provide leadership. president morsi in cairo called mr. jabari, the terrorist who was killed, a martyr. the muslim brotherhood does have a close relationship with hamas. iran has given hundreds of millions of dollars to
's andrew kohut. and we examine the complex relationship between turkey and syria. margaret warner is in the region and reports from refugee camps on both sides of the border. all that and more is on our web site newshour.pbs.org. ray? >> suarez: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm ray suarez. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening with david brooks and ruth marcus among others. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
months as the war in syria has taken attention away, as the revolution in egypt, et cetera. this is a back-to-to the future situation where the issue that's been there all along, that hasn't received a lot of attention, but rockets have been going from gaza into israel many weeks and months now and a certain point was reached it was deemed intolerable. >> let's talk about the balance of power here, because egypt has, obviously, always been a player to some degree, much better relations with efwipts and have been able to expert pressure. we were discussing this earlier. we do not have that as much anymore given the fact that the new muslim brotherhood is basically in cahoots with hamas, the egyptian prime minister says egypt is standing by the people of gaza in their pain. that radically changes the u.s. calculus in the region or how much we can actually do. >> yeah. i don't think it changes our objectives but i think it changes what we can accomplish. the united states doesn't talk to hamas. so in the past, the way we've been able to promote potential cease-fires or agreeme
of it. perhaps it's iran wanting to deflect attention from syria. perhaps it's an effort by hamas to in effect bridle its credentials to prove to the palestinians on the west bank that its route is the best way to deal with israel. >> while britain and germany have both said hamas bears the brunt of the blame, mohamed morsi appears to lay some blame on the israelis. is he torn with his fellow islamists and the need to maintain the treaty obligations with israel? >> martin, if he isn't yet, he could be soon, and that's, of course, the real danger here. if this thing goes on just for a short time, then maybe we wind up okay. but if it goes on for days or weeks, like the 2008-2009 war that ambassador ginsberg referred to, then i think all bets are off as to just how long the egyptian regime can really sustain this stance of sort of being between the two. you know, in a broader sense, of course, the cease-fire that hamas had respected for a number of years never reflected a fundamental strategic change by hamas. it was more a temporary recognition that fighting the what i they had bee
for the first time units us, unlike in syria so we don't have the divisions we're facing in syria so we have unifieded the international community as that supports the political settlements so i think this opportunity should be used. so far, there are settlements to face, but i think we should have hope, faith, and i think the political settlement, this provides a grant for hope in the future. thank you. >> thank you. >> i'd like to echo dan in thanking you all for coming out on the dreary day, especially for a holiday for many of you, and thanks to ibrahim as well for staying up late and giving us those great insights. as all of us know, the united states has just been through a presidential election. president obama was re-elected, and the obama administration had a number of, i think, foreign policy and counterterrorism successes in the first administration. obviously, bin laden was killed in the special operations raid. president obama oversaw the drawdown of troops in iran as well as afghanistan and, yet, i think the lasting legacy from the first term of the obama administration may wel
there are competing considerings for both sides. the high level of volatility in the region. think about it, syria on israel's northern border, egypt on the southern border, now jordan. there's a lot of volatility, a lot of uncertainty. israel has benefited in a military sense enormously since its creation by disunity and lack of coordination among arabs. and that continues to this day. but they don't want to do anything that's likely to spark a wider conflict that would result in the end of its treaties with egypt and jordan and might lead to some degree of unification between arabs, being eroded by their common opposition to israel. >> norah? >> how much of this a test for the new egyptian government and president morsi? >> it's a very serious test for president morsi and the egyptian government. they, of course, have the same kind of conflicts in a reverse sense from those that israel does. they're trying to stabilize their own country, trying to recover from the economic decline that occurred immediately following the revolution, which led them into power. and at the same time, they have to re
sending missile parts to syria. we've talked about the relationship between north korea and the middle east before. this is the first we've heard of this and this happened a couple of months ago. what do you make of it, what is the involvement we need to watch. >> this is a continuation of a trend because the north koreans have been not only selling missiles but nuclear reactors. the reactor destroyed in 2007, that was a north korean reactor. iran paid for it. the united states has not been paying enough attention to north korean proliferation. jenna: there is so much to watch, gordon how do you prioritize. >> that is the real problem, the crises is come one right after the other. it will be very difficult for the administration or even a bunch of countries to be able to deal with this because there is too much happening all at once. jenna: it certainly feels that way. you give us a lot of thins to think about. it's good to have you on set. thank you. appreciate it very much. jon: a couple of icons of the american lunch box could be no more. we might be seeing the last of the twinninge
in and day in and day out, from syria, iran, libya. they would've taken some of the resources and money for the welfare of their own people, it could have turned completely different. look at the number of missiles that they managed to organize out there. this is who we are up against. we are up against an organization that doesn't recognize the right to exist. people forget that. they don't recognize the right to exist. they preach to the genocide of jews. they are enemies to anyone who says, hey, what would happen? are not people we can talk to, but these guys are the enemy. we are targeting the military infrastructure, so at the end of the day, we will be able to sit down with reasonable people to do something. megyn: the rocket fire had been raining in israel for some time. finally, israel struck back and took out the equivalent of, they say it is like hamas's osama the modern -- osama bin laden. they say that this is like a new york or los angeles. can you speak to this? at the huge number of troops -- potentially up to 75,000 troops. what can be done? according to trace gallagher'
that their shipments to syria and elsewhere continue. >> with respect to north korea -- they would have to demonstrate a seriousness of purpose with respect to meeting their dated goal of denuclearization. we have not seen that. we have engaged with the north koreans on a normal basis. we have not seen the steps from them to date. we have also laid out clearly what they need to do in terms of that kind of demonstration of seriousness with respect to denuclearization. we have not seen that from them at this point. that is an interesting question about you asked burma and the united states and president obama's embrace of their reform efforts and support for it. in no other way that you can imagine is an entry by burma into the international community and what opportunity that it provides economically. that is an important focus of the burmese leadership. the economic prospects and promises of their coming into the international community and supported by the u.s. that is a path that if the north koreans would address the nuclear issue that would be available to them. we have said that from the outset.
erupted in 2003 to a broad degree, and that now includes syria in turmoil, really in a deep civil war, egypt having had the revolution and change of government. jordan. there was, of course, the conflict in gaza in 2008, and the daenk now if it is, it could be spread. not just to israelis and palestinians, but if you had a conflict that spread throughout the region, it could be hugely destabilizing and costly to everyone involved. >> i think the president is on the right course. it's trying to use all the allies to encourage both parties to step back from an escalation of the conflict. that's very difficult. israel has the right to defend itself against the barrage of rockets that have accelerated dramatically in recent days and no doubt will do so wanting to deter such action in the future. the problem is if this escalates that, could have devastating consequences for all concerned, so it's a tension there trying to accomplish one objective without having it reverse and cause greater damage in the future. >> talk about the role of the arab spring here, because obviously, you have a d
've got syria to the north. there are already 200,000 syrian refugees on jordanian soil. you have saudi arabia, iraq, it's a difficult place to be in. >> that is a rough neighborhood. >> it is a rough neighborhood. the monarchy has always been pro-western, always been reliable and allowed u.s. and uk forces to stay there on various missions in the region. it's an important ally. >> you mention the monarchy, which is interesting. is it at risk? i mean, is there anything that the king can do? >> there's plenty the king can do. jordan has an intensely loyal and very efficient set of security services, the military, intelligence services, very loyal to the king. so it's not a sort of regime that would crumble overnight. what he has to do according to people i've spoken with in the last couple days is come up with some grand political initiative that allows the opposition to say, yeah, you will take part in parliamentary elections. at the moment they're boycotting them. saying you're not giving enough power to constitutional government. you're keeping everything to yourself. he has to come u
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)

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